Family adventures: The Forest of Dean part 2 | AD

  (read part one here)

Sunday morning we all awoke to the sun filtering through the trees had a had another lazy breakfast before taking a little walk with the dog round the woodland trail right behind our cabin.

We followed the path through the woods, passed by runners on a morning jog and other dog walkers and spied yet more cabins nestled in amongst the trees. We had a little play and climb in a clearing before continuing on the loop that took us right round and back into the site. This is what I loved most about the Forest Holidays setting, that it was so easy just to step out the door and be immersed in the woods and nature.

Our plans for the day included a trip to the near by Beechenhurst lodge for a walk around and to have a go at the Go Ape they have on site there. Theo actually visited this place for his birthday back in January, where he and two friends and Rob travelled up just for the day to have a go, this is what originally inspired us to discover the Forest of Dean further! Seeing as Rob went last time Theo wanted me to join him, which I did thinking it would be easy but in actual fact I quickly realised that I'm not too keen on heights! This was actually only the kids trail, so I definitely wouldn't be able to do an adult one! Who knew that getting older meant that these fears suddenly creep in without you knowing?! Theo had a great time though, even though he was still a little hesitant - maybe he was picking up on my vibes! The staff were all really friendly and understanding that some people need a little more time and really tried their hardest to make you feel at ease! It definitely makes for a great place to take kids for a birthday or special occasion, or just something fun to do on a day out. Prices are £19 per person and you get an hour up in the trees and it is pretty fun (even if you are a bit afraid of heights!)

After having our fill of the heights we met back up with Rob and had a little lunch in the cafe on site and met up with my mum whilst we played in the park which was lovely for both the boys. We then went on a little walk around the grounds which has a sculpture trail and a mini 'Zog' trail for kids which you could purchase a little activity bag for for £3 in the cafe. Rohan had a little sleep whilst we navigated around and did the trail and the pup loped around having a whale of a time! There is a sculpture trail which we tried to follow in parts, but we either got a little lost or the sculptures were no longe there as we didn't see any which was a shame, but by this point the weather was just starting to turn so we decided to head back to the lodge for dinner.

We had bought ingredients for a BBQ and even though it was tipping it down we decided to have it anyway, but just eat inside, but if the weather had been nice there is a big table on the outside decking which would be perfect for sunny evenings eating surrounded by the forest. We of course had another dip in the hot tub, even in the rain!


On Monday it was time to pack up our lovely lodge and leave, even though we all agreed that we could have definitely stayed for a week and explore more! We were definitely sad to leave, so much so that we decided to stop off on the way home just to make the most of it, plus the weather was pretty lovely so it felt a shame to waste the day seeing as it only takes an hour to get home.

We stopped off at Goodrich Castle where we've been a few times before so we knew it was a good place to spend a few hours. It's set in a beautiful grounds and scenery and it's so interesting to read all about the history of the castle. Rohan had a little wander around whilst Theo and Rob climbed up the towers and we just soaked up the quiet morning!

We had an early picnic lunch back at the cafe and shop area before reluctantly heading back home. It really was such a great way to spend the weekend, and really made us have quality time as a family doing things we all really enjoy. I didn't really realise how easy it was to get to this area from Bristol, especially now that the bridge is toll free and there's just so much more to do here, so we'll definitely be back to explore further, next time even bringing our own bikes maybe!


Our trip was in collaboration with The Forest of Dean tourism board, our accommodation, travel and activities were gifted as part of the review but all words and images are my own. 

Easter adventures part two


We took our annual trip down to Teignmouth for the second part of the Easter holidays, me with the boys for most of the week with Rob joining us for the weekend. We were having our house decorated so we needed to be out the way for most of it but visiting Rob's grandparents and being by the sea is one of our favourite things to do so it really wasn't much hassle!

We timed it just right with the mini heatwave hitting at just the right time meaning we spent a few days down by the seafront, and Theo even went properly swimming! Rohan was still pretty apprehensive about the water, think he may be more of a warm med kind of boy!

This visit will be our last proper one to Teignmouth itself as Rob's grandparents are due to move to a nearby town in the Summer. Before I'd met Rob I'd never really been to this part of Devon, but it's safe to say that it's one of our favourite places to visit. We've been here so much over the past 9 years that it's crazy to think how much of our lives have changed. We've seen me visit right at the end of my pregnancy, through all of Theo's infant-hood to him staying down on his own like a big boy and to Rohan being born. We've had a visit to the hospital when he was pretty poorly and enjoyed introducing him to so much that we love here.

We've been on countless steam trains, played in the sea, eaten 10,569 ice creams, been to the zoo, museums, play parks, the aquarium, explored surrounding towns, visited all the charity shops, been to the cinema, had takeaways, eaten chips on the seafront, celebrated Easter's with woodland egg hunts, and most importantly have spent so many wonderful weeks with Rob's grandparents. I've always been made to feel so unbelievably welcome and like part of the family from the very beginning, and can just see how much joy visiting brings both the boys. We've all been throughly spoilt whenever we've visited and it just makes me feel so happy about the adventures and time we've spent down there. I know we'll be able to visit Teignmouth again when they move, as it's really not far and we have a new place to explore with them, but I just thought it deserved it's very own mention. I'm going to go and have a look through old posts now and probably cry at how much time has passed!


We of course also visited the pier and for the first time Rohan had a good old explore and just loved watching all of the lights and the machines, I think we may have to also get him addicted to 2p machines like the rest of us!




Then it was time for one last Easter egg hunt in the beautiful nature reserve just down the road from the house, it's been our place to go for the past three or four years and Theo is just about still believing! We had to tell him that the Easter bunny will move locations when they move and that also every child is assigned their very own bunny when they are born...not sure that one will really last!


Thanks Teignmouth x

May Camping


Last weekend we packed up for a little bit of camping in Dorset, but before I get round to sharing that I thought I would show you pictures from our first trip this year. We made a total last minute decision on the first bank holiday weekend in May, as the weather was supposed to be lovely. We flipped a coin and everything! We just went for one night, picked a place off of google in Devon, packed up the minimum for one night and headed there in the car.

The campsite was amazing, it had a small pool and great play park, but the best was the view from the camping field (away from all the caravans too!) They had electric and water points, but just up the brow of the hill the most amazing view of the sea opened up in front, and all you could see was blue. We saw the sun set on the first night, and the sun just after it had risen in the morning..not that we planned too, but camping equals early rising. I can't say I minded too much though.

The trip came at just the right time, I needed to reset. The sea always helps me do this, and I sat for a long time just looking out and enjoying the silence. We'll definitely be back, and I'm hoping that perhaps if September is nice, we may be able to squeeze in one more trip!






May Camping


Last weekend we packed up for a little bit of camping in Dorset, but before I get round to sharing that I thought I would show you pictures from our first trip this year. We made a total last minute decision on the first bank holiday weekend in May, as the weather was supposed to be lovely. We flipped a coin and everything! We just went for one night, picked a place off of google in Devon, packed up the minimum for one night and headed there in the car.

The campsite was amazing, it had a small pool and great play park, but the best was the view from the camping field (away from all the caravans too!) They had electric and water points, but just up the brow of the hill the most amazing view of the sea opened up in front, and all you could see was blue. We saw the sun set on the first night, and the sun just after it had risen in the morning..not that we planned too, but camping equals early rising. I can't say I minded too much though.

The trip came at just the right time, I needed to reset. The sea always helps me do this, and I sat for a long time just looking out and enjoying the silence. We'll definitely be back, and I'm hoping that perhaps if September is nice, we may be able to squeeze in one more trip!






Going to Camp Bestival with an additional needs child - our experience


I wanted to talk a little about taking Rohan, or a child with additional needs to a festival. Before I start though I know that this is just our situation and isn't the same or possible for everyone, and is unique to our family.

Before Rohan was born we took Theo to two festivals, he loved them and always just loved being able to roam about, playing and having that freedom that being at a festival gives you a little more. (Not saying it's always easy, as relaxed bedtimes and changed routines can be difficult!) But I loved seeing him enjoy these new experiences and make those memories.

I've been going to festivals for the past 16 years and feel pretty comfortable at them, so when were invited to go to Camp Bestival this year we all felt confident that we could do it, even with all the extras that Rohan brings. I know that this might not always be the case, but we want to show him lots of different experiences and get him used to as many different environments as possible as we know that his syndrome has the tendency to be stubborn and not like new places etc. But we also want to make sure to some degree that we can still do the things we and Theo enjoy doing too without having to completely change our lives because of Rohan. There are already so many things we've had to change, but we've always been fairly certain that we want some aspects of our lifestyle to still be possible. We don't know how the future will look and what will or won't be possible but for now we can't think that far and just have to try and do things that feel right now, and are manageable. 



We have to stay in the accessible camping as we need electric for Rohan's CPAP machine so he can sleep, we also have a battery meaning we can take it out in the buggy for napping in the day, but he's not great at this. Being in the accessible campsite was such an eye opener for me as seeing people with children or adults with a whole range of different needs and abilities still being able to go to a festival was amazing. It may not be perfect, or work the same as a "regular family" going to a festival as there's so much more to think about, but it made me happy that it's possible. We met some lovely people camping around us, all who were in accessible camping for different reasons. 

In terms of what we did there I want to talk more about it, but really we just stayed around the kid activity bits rather than the music and big tents. In the past when we've taken Theo to festivals we've done a mix of things, like playing in the kids fields, watching bands and music on the main stage and in tents and staying out late with a trolley for Theo to sleep in. I think it's great to find a mix where you're all happy. Camp Bestival is a little different as there is just SO much to do for kids, which is great, and honestly we didn't really think too much about going to see music. Hopefully if we go back another year then we will try and incorporate it, but for now with Rohan not being mobile it would be hard on him to take him into a tent and be stuck in a buggy with loud music. We did spend quite a lot of time walking around the site and taking Theo to different activities which Rohan was more than happy to do. He loves being able to just watch other children and meet people, and for example when Theo was doing a workshop or making something one of us would just stay with Rohan and he would go up to and make friends with whoever was around. Rohan loved watching the big screen by the main stage, and we watched a circus show that he seemed to enjoy too. Above all though finding somewhere where both Rohan and Theo could be happy to just play was great, and there was a perfect area in the Dingly Dell woods with a mud kitchen and a stage and instruments made out of wood where we spent quite a bit of time just being free to do what they both wanted. 



I think one of the things we found most difficult was Rohan not being fully mobile, but luckily because the ground was so dry (before the rain and wind came in!) he was able to shuffle about on his bottom for the most part, we did think about bringing his walker with us, but as he doesn't use it all of the time and is still getting to grips with is we thought it might be a bit too much. The ground was pretty hilly and bumpy too so actually in hindsight I'm not sure whether it would've been very beneficial anyway. There were times when I think he didn't quite know what he wanted though, and was probably over tired when it did become a little difficult to keep him happy. The change in bedtimes and routine I think hit him the hardest, as well as not being in our home environment. I think a lot of the time he is just happy being able to move around and play with his toys and watch other people. Sometimes I think he gets over stimulated too. 

One afternoon I took Rohan off to try and find some things for him to do specifically for him and we loved the lower kids field as they had a big tent just for toddlers where we spent quite a bit of time. Rowie loved the ball pool and the little ride on toys and just watching the other kids run around, I think it really helped him just to chill out in one area for an hour or so and to just be a bit freer to roam about. He also really enjoyed watching the circus show on the little stage in the kids field. 

We made sure we went back to the tent in the day though for a little while, mainly to have lunch there (to save money!) but also just to have some time out and to reset. I think especially for little ones it can all be a bit of a sensory overload, so we just let Rohan have a play and a shuffle about in the quiet of the tent. We did make sure we took some of his favourite toys with us so he felt comfortable and would feel relaxed. We've been camping with him a few times before this, which I guess if you've not done before committing to a festival, I think is a good idea. We know that Rohan more or less sleeps the same in the tent, and we also take his travel cot, so it's not too bad (other than earlier than usual wake up times!) But I can imagine that if it's a new environment and experience sleeping in a tent then that on top of the experience of being at a festival for the first time could be a bit over whelming. The first evening we tried to keep to fairly normal bedtime routine and stayed at the camp whilst Rohan went to bed. The next night we decided we'd like to stay out a little later and enjoy being in the festival atmosphere, so we took his CPAP machine out with us in the buggy and got him ready for bed. He did stay up later than normal but we eventually managed to get in to sleep in the pushchair (it lies flat which is a bonus!) When we've previously taken Theo to festivals we've hired a trolley with a canopy which was perfect for staying out in the evening, so as Rohan gets older then perhaps that would be a good option for him. The staying up late was fine whilst it lasted but we were all definitely knackered after, I don't think we're quite cut out for late nights yet!! 



All in all we had an amazing experience with Rohan (I'll talk about the rest of the festival soon!) and we'd definitely take him to another festival. The accessible camping was brilliant for us, an essential, but it made our life a lot easier. Camp Bestival was a great as our first as a family of four, and for taking a child with additional needs. I'd say that the only thing that we were slightly disappointed by was that by the main stage they had an accessible area, which is great that they created an area, but it did feel a little like a pen and was quite far back and to the side of the stage. It also meant that when everyone else in front of the "area" and barriers stood up with kids on their shoulders, you couldn't see the stage, which if you were unable to stand yourself then it just defeated the object of being in an accessible area. 

We don't know what our future looks like or what Rohan will be capable of doing, but for now it feels like it's definitely a great option for something for our family, and from seeing lots of other families with a wide range of needs enjoying the festival it encourages me that it will be possible in the future. Again I'm not saying that it's the right environment for everyone, but for us it felt great to be able to do something that we used to enjoy as a family without too many problems or differences. It makes me hopeful for future festival fun! 

If you're interested in going then early bird tickets for next year are now on sale! Hopefully we'll make it again!


*We were invited to Camp Bestival as guests in return for a review, but all images, words and opinions are my own! 

Going to Camp Bestival with an additional needs child - our experience


I wanted to talk a little about taking Rohan, or a child with additional needs to a festival. Before I start though I know that this is just our situation and isn't the same or possible for everyone, and is unique to our family.

Before Rohan was born we took Theo to two festivals, he loved them and always just loved being able to roam about, playing and having that freedom that being at a festival gives you a little more. (Not saying it's always easy, as relaxed bedtimes and changed routines can be difficult!) But I loved seeing him enjoy these new experiences and make those memories.

I've been going to festivals for the past 16 years and feel pretty comfortable at them, so when were invited to go to Camp Bestival this year we all felt confident that we could do it, even with all the extras that Rohan brings. I know that this might not always be the case, but we want to show him lots of different experiences and get him used to as many different environments as possible as we know that his syndrome has the tendency to be stubborn and not like new places etc. But we also want to make sure to some degree that we can still do the things we and Theo enjoy doing too without having to completely change our lives because of Rohan. There are already so many things we've had to change, but we've always been fairly certain that we want some aspects of our lifestyle to still be possible. We don't know how the future will look and what will or won't be possible but for now we can't think that far and just have to try and do things that feel right now, and are manageable. 



We have to stay in the accessible camping as we need electric for Rohan's CPAP machine so he can sleep, we also have a battery meaning we can take it out in the buggy for napping in the day, but he's not great at this. Being in the accessible campsite was such an eye opener for me as seeing people with children or adults with a whole range of different needs and abilities still being able to go to a festival was amazing. It may not be perfect, or work the same as a "regular family" going to a festival as there's so much more to think about, but it made me happy that it's possible. We met some lovely people camping around us, all who were in accessible camping for different reasons. 

In terms of what we did there I want to talk more about it, but really we just stayed around the kid activity bits rather than the music and big tents. In the past when we've taken Theo to festivals we've done a mix of things, like playing in the kids fields, watching bands and music on the main stage and in tents and staying out late with a trolley for Theo to sleep in. I think it's great to find a mix where you're all happy. Camp Bestival is a little different as there is just SO much to do for kids, which is great, and honestly we didn't really think too much about going to see music. Hopefully if we go back another year then we will try and incorporate it, but for now with Rohan not being mobile it would be hard on him to take him into a tent and be stuck in a buggy with loud music. We did spend quite a lot of time walking around the site and taking Theo to different activities which Rohan was more than happy to do. He loves being able to just watch other children and meet people, and for example when Theo was doing a workshop or making something one of us would just stay with Rohan and he would go up to and make friends with whoever was around. Rohan loved watching the big screen by the main stage, and we watched a circus show that he seemed to enjoy too. Above all though finding somewhere where both Rohan and Theo could be happy to just play was great, and there was a perfect area in the Dingly Dell woods with a mud kitchen and a stage and instruments made out of wood where we spent quite a bit of time just being free to do what they both wanted. 



I think one of the things we found most difficult was Rohan not being fully mobile, but luckily because the ground was so dry (before the rain and wind came in!) he was able to shuffle about on his bottom for the most part, we did think about bringing his walker with us, but as he doesn't use it all of the time and is still getting to grips with is we thought it might be a bit too much. The ground was pretty hilly and bumpy too so actually in hindsight I'm not sure whether it would've been very beneficial anyway. There were times when I think he didn't quite know what he wanted though, and was probably over tired when it did become a little difficult to keep him happy. The change in bedtimes and routine I think hit him the hardest, as well as not being in our home environment. I think a lot of the time he is just happy being able to move around and play with his toys and watch other people. Sometimes I think he gets over stimulated too. 

One afternoon I took Rohan off to try and find some things for him to do specifically for him and we loved the lower kids field as they had a big tent just for toddlers where we spent quite a bit of time. Rowie loved the ball pool and the little ride on toys and just watching the other kids run around, I think it really helped him just to chill out in one area for an hour or so and to just be a bit freer to roam about. He also really enjoyed watching the circus show on the little stage in the kids field. 

We made sure we went back to the tent in the day though for a little while, mainly to have lunch there (to save money!) but also just to have some time out and to reset. I think especially for little ones it can all be a bit of a sensory overload, so we just let Rohan have a play and a shuffle about in the quiet of the tent. We did make sure we took some of his favourite toys with us so he felt comfortable and would feel relaxed. We've been camping with him a few times before this, which I guess if you've not done before committing to a festival, I think is a good idea. We know that Rohan more or less sleeps the same in the tent, and we also take his travel cot, so it's not too bad (other than earlier than usual wake up times!) But I can imagine that if it's a new environment and experience sleeping in a tent then that on top of the experience of being at a festival for the first time could be a bit over whelming. The first evening we tried to keep to fairly normal bedtime routine and stayed at the camp whilst Rohan went to bed. The next night we decided we'd like to stay out a little later and enjoy being in the festival atmosphere, so we took his CPAP machine out with us in the buggy and got him ready for bed. He did stay up later than normal but we eventually managed to get in to sleep in the pushchair (it lies flat which is a bonus!) When we've previously taken Theo to festivals we've hired a trolley with a canopy which was perfect for staying out in the evening, so as Rohan gets older then perhaps that would be a good option for him. The staying up late was fine whilst it lasted but we were all definitely knackered after, I don't think we're quite cut out for late nights yet!! 



All in all we had an amazing experience with Rohan (I'll talk about the rest of the festival soon!) and we'd definitely take him to another festival. The accessible camping was brilliant for us, an essential, but it made our life a lot easier. Camp Bestival was a great as our first as a family of four, and for taking a child with additional needs. I'd say that the only thing that we were slightly disappointed by was that by the main stage they had an accessible area, which is great that they created an area, but it did feel a little like a pen and was quite far back and to the side of the stage. It also meant that when everyone else in front of the "area" and barriers stood up with kids on their shoulders, you couldn't see the stage, which if you were unable to stand yourself then it just defeated the object of being in an accessible area. 

We don't know what our future looks like or what Rohan will be capable of doing, but for now it feels like it's definitely a great option for something for our family, and from seeing lots of other families with a wide range of needs enjoying the festival it encourages me that it will be possible in the future. Again I'm not saying that it's the right environment for everyone, but for us it felt great to be able to do something that we used to enjoy as a family without too many problems or differences. It makes me hopeful for future festival fun! 

If you're interested in going then early bird tickets for next year are now on sale! Hopefully we'll make it again!


*We were invited to Camp Bestival as guests in return for a review, but all images, words and opinions are my own! 

Eurocamp holiday part one! Our holiday home, the park and childhood memories.


When I was a child my overriding memory of holidays were being squashed in the middle seat in the back of the car (I was the youngest therefore had the last choice) watching the French countryside whoosh past the windows. To this day I can't listen to Simply Red or eat cadbury's eclairs for the overwhelming feeling of carsickness to overcome me. I remember playing eye spy, word association games and eating the powdered sugar from the bottom of the sweet tin. We'd take our pillows from home and make little comfy nests in the back seat. The car would be full and hard to see out the back of and on the way home our feet would rest upon cases of wine. I remember driving up in the early hours of the morning and waiting in line with cars and lorries before finally being able to drive into the belly of a great big ferry. I remember the metal smell and the clanking noises as you emerged from the car and raced up the stairs holding those cold metal railings. We'd go to the deck and watch the land disappear behind a trail of froth.


Some years we took longer ferry crossings, where we'd try and sleep on the benches. We'd have activity books, packs of cards and happy families. One year we took a particularly rough crossing on a hover craft, the only one that decided to sail that day. I think my sister and my dad were the only ones on the whole boat who didn't throw up and the waves came up higher than the windows. It's fair to say that we never took the hover craft again.

Once in France we'd drive until we reached our campsite for the next a couple of weeks. We'd stop at the side of the road stopping places and hope that the toilets wouldn't be the hole in the ground kind where you'd have to squat. The parking always had picnic benches and smelt of pine trees, we'd stretch our legs before cramping back in the car to continue our journey. We'd pass by fields of sunflowers, poppies and corn, the occasional Chateaux on the horizon. Towns would look different and the highlight was always going to the big french Hypermarkets. We'd spend hours there, looking at all the fresh produce, bagging up cherries and being able to press the symbol on the weighing machines. We'd always be allowed to choose a bar of chocolate, the own brand, wrapped just in clear cellophane. I'd always choose either hazelnut or one with rice crispies in. We'd stock up on biscuits and if we were lucky got a Pez dispenser. We used to look at all the bikes and toys lined up and I remember using our 1 franc coins the get bubblegum and plastic rings from the little machines.

I remember the excitement of driving into the holiday park, finding the eurocamp reception and waiting in the car until my dad reappeared with the courier who would cycle ahead of use to show us our home. We'd usually stay in the tents, which had separate bedroom compartments and red framed metal beds. We'd roll out our sleeping bags and place our favourite toy we'd brought from home on the bed. There'd be a little kitchen and a big door to the outside sitting area complete with white plastic table and chairs and the classic Eurocamp red and green umbrella. Sometimes we'd take our bikes and set about exploring the row and begin to make friends with the other children near by.


We'd go to the kids clubs where we'd have our faces painted, we'd play board games and sports. Other days we'd spend all day by the pool, and always hoped for a park that had water slides. The campsites would be in big pine forest and be hot and sunny. I remember visiting French towns, walking around gardens and old houses. Sometimes we'd visit a beach and meet up with family friends who happened to be staying in the same area as us. The days were always long and my sisters were always my playmates. My parents would make friends with other English families and we'd share meals. I remember always eating artichoke, pistachio nuts and trying olives for the first time. We'd stay up late and listen to the crickets and hunt for fireflies. The holiday seemed to last for ages, and honestly I loved them. We did do other holidays, and were lucky enough to visit the USA a few times as well as Greece and Italy, but I will always associate my childhood holidays with France and Eurocamp.

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Last year when we went to visit my sister in Barcelona we decided last minute to book a Eurocamp break a short distance from Barcelona. It was the first time we'd been back since I was a child and honestly I didn't know what to expect. But we had a great time, and Theo loved it and asked to go back again the following year.

We hadn't really thought about where we would go this year, and since we found out that Rohan is due to have potentially a few surgeries at some point this year, it made it really hard to plan and commit to putting money down. So when Eurocamp contacted me at the beginning of the year about visiting one of their parks, as part of a review, there was no hesitation at all. We wanted to try out another park anyway, so this was a perfect opportunity.


We've been thinking of trying to take Theo to visit Disneyland Paris for a year or so but trying to work out a way to do it. We can't afford to stay at one of the hotels or just go for a few days (we hardly go abroad so really need to make the most of being in a different country!) so when this came up we decided to combine the two and pick a park close to Disney. This also meant that we were just over an hour outside of Paris, and Theo has been obsessed with visiting the Eiffel Tower for a long time after seeing it in various books. We also wanted to find a park that emulated those childhood memories and had to have a good pool seeing as that's what Theo loves doing (and now Rohan too!)

As a note we could've chosen a park anywhere, and in the future now that we've got Disney out of our system, I'd love to be able to visit a different part of France or another country. Eurocamp have places in parks all over Europe and I'd love to visit Italy, more of Spain, Portugal, Croatia, Holland, Germany and all over.

We stayed at a park called La Croix du Vieux Pont, near the town of Soissons just an hour or so north -east of Paris. The park was also a really good distance from Calais which meant that after a short ferry crossing it was only about a 2 hour drive to the campsite (it took us more than double that to get from Bristol to Dover!) which was ideal for us, as Rohan is still young and being stuck in a car for long journeys isn't that enjoyable.

When we arrived we drove around a little trying to find the Eurocamp reception. Going back as an adult and being in charge of knowing where to go is such a different experience! We eventually found the right place and picked up the keys to the mobile home we'd be staying in. I was a little disappointed we didn't get shown to our place by a courier, one because of childhood memories, but two (and most importantly) we weren't quite sure if we'd got the right place straightaway and there was no eurocamp branding on the home so it took a little while to confirm that it was the right place, which would have been nice not to have the stress of trying to find it. Last year at the other park we stayed on we were taken to our mobile home and all was fine.

But once we'd found it we set upon exploring and unpacking. The mobile home was pretty new and modern and the facilities were great. We were staying in an Azure holiday home which claims can sleep up to 6 adults, but in all honesty I think 6 would be a squeeze. The living area was slightly smaller than I was imagining, and the space in the bedrooms pretty limited. Theo and Rohan shared a room, with a single bed and a travel cot set up. The other room had two single beds, but very limited space in between them, so would make sharing with two adults fairly cramped! The main bedroom had a great king sized bed, but again not a lot of room around the edges. But all the rooms come with a great amount of storage, so you just had to make sure that all your things were put away to avoid feeling over cramped. But if you were a family of four, five or even six (two adults and the rest children) I think the space would be fine. 

The rest of the living space was pretty well thought out. There was a separate toilet and massive shower room, which actually was really good as our previous holiday home had a pretty small shower room. It meant that it was actually a better place to get ready than the bedrooms. The kitchen was pretty well equipped, and the appliances all modern. Something that differed from our last place we stayed in, was that there was a proper fixed table (the other had a moveable pull out table around the sofa) with six chairs, which was great for being able to share meals inside with. It did eat into quite a lot of the living space though, so I'm not sure whether it was for the best or not, but it was good for food preparation.  One other thing to mention was that the main bedroom door opened right onto the kitchen and the chairs would often get in the way of the door being able to close so made it a little annoying! The rest of the living space was taken up with an L shaped sofa which was comfy, but perhaps didn't have the best covering to make it feel cosy. I might also add that it didn't have air conditioning, just a fan, and even in June it was quite warm, but I think that at some campsites they do come with a/c so it's worth checking if that's a big deal for you (I know in Spain last year in August it was definitely needed!)

 It was all quite easy to keep clean which is good. We also requested baby items and it came with the classic ikea highchair (always a winner!) and a booster seat. Luckily we bought our own washing basket which doubled up as a baby bath which we used for Rohan an just sat him on the deck with! Because the holiday home was modern a lot of the features and building materials were also environmentally friendly, which I thought was a positive step. Another great feature was that all the windows had pull up black out blinds and mosquito nets, which made it easier to keep the light out of the boys room when they eventually went to bed, and we didn't get bitten once!


The best part of the holiday home was the great covered decking area out the front of the home. It was fenced and had a gate which meant it was perfect for Rohan to be able to be out there too without us worrying about him going down the steps. It also had a large table with lots of chairs and we spent most of our time out here, eating meals, playing games and storing our swimming things and shoes. It There were a few thunder storms whilst we were there, and it was great to be able to still sit outside and watch it whilst the rain poured down but be kept dry. The campsite was also brilliantly laid out meaning that each pitch had their own front garden, with sun loungers and a bbq, which had a lot of space and offered great privacy. I loved how much green there was, and each of the pitches in our area had their own willow tree. We also had a some very friendly ducks and little birds who liked to come and visit us daily and I just loved how peaceful it was. 

We did really like our accommodation despite of the points I've mentioned. I think having less space is to be expected from mobile homes, and all the beds were really comfy and like I mentioned the storage was great. The homes come with all the basics you need for cooking and eating, and the beds with pillows and duvets. You have the option of adding on bedding and towels for an extra cost, which we did as it was just one less thing to think about and take up room, but you could easily just bring your own too if you were on a budget. You can also purchase an essentials pack which includes things like washing up liquid, oil and sponges, again great to not have to think about these things, but also easy to pick up at the supermarket. 

We were given a welcome pack explaining bits about the park, such as opening hours of the shops, restaurant and pool. From memory and our last experience we did have a courier come round to our holiday home to check that we'd settled in ok and ask if we had any questions or needed anything, which we were disappointed to find that they didn't do here. We did have to go back to reception a few times to find out information, and whilst they were helpful it would have been nice to feel a little looked after and not forgotten! We had to go and ask about the kids club and certain questions about the park which could have been answered if they'd come for a check up. Anyway, on the whole they were friendly and perhaps some people prefer to be left alone to just get on with their holiday! (It may be different on other parks, as it was last year for us)

The park itself was really good. It was well laid out and easy to walk around and discover all it had to offer. It had all the facilities you could need, such as a well stocked shop and bakery with fresh bread daily. It had a gift shop which sold toys, clothes, postcards and stamps, a few laundrettes with self service machines and toilet blocks dotted about. There were also play parks, the pool complex and then a few different lakes. One of the lakes was for fishing and you could also hire out pedalos (which we did but will share later!) a smaller lake which was for swimming and surrounded by sand with a beachside bar and restaurant to get snacks, meals, ice-cream and drinks. There were quite a few really good play parks dotted around too. There was the main bar area and restaurant also, located by the pools, but again I'll write a little more about the pool later! 

What we loved about the park was how green it was, each path and road was carefully thought out, and there were lots of trees, bushes, hedges and loads of beautiful beds full of flowers. There were climbing roses all over the place and it was all so well kept and looked after. The whole place was really clean too and it was a lovely place to walk around. There is also part of the local river than runs by the bottom of the park and an entrance to what looked like a formal park just by our home. We ran out of time to explore properly, as really I feel we needed longer than a week, what with having two days off the park going out and about. Really if you take out the two days for travelling we only had five full days, when really at least 10 days would have been the perfect amount. 


Once we'd settled in and unpacked it was pretty late so we had our first dinner sitting on the decking and played some games. We were pretty excited to explore the next day, and recover a little from the journey. We visited the local supermarket about 20 minutes away and stocked up on all we needed for the week. We planned to eat mostly at the holiday home to save money (as we needed to save for our outings!) as well as picking out some childhood favourites, and maybe going a little overboard with chocolate and biscuits...

I'll leave it there for now and share a little more about the pools and beach, and what we got up to whilst on the park, as well as share our trips out! 

I made a little video of our first few days too! Keep an eye out for more soon! 


We were gifted our accomadation, travel and extras in return for a review, but all my thoughts, opinions, images and words are my own.

Eurocamp holiday part one! Our holiday home, the park and childhood memories.


When I was a child my overriding memory of holidays were being squashed in the middle seat in the back of the car (I was the youngest therefore had the last choice) watching the French countryside whoosh past the windows. To this day I can't listen to Simply Red or eat cadbury's eclairs for the overwhelming feeling of carsickness to overcome me. I remember playing eye spy, word association games and eating the powdered sugar from the bottom of the sweet tin. We'd take our pillows from home and make little comfy nests in the back seat. The car would be full and hard to see out the back of and on the way home our feet would rest upon cases of wine. I remember driving up in the early hours of the morning and waiting in line with cars and lorries before finally being able to drive into the belly of a great big ferry. I remember the metal smell and the clanking noises as you emerged from the car and raced up the stairs holding those cold metal railings. We'd go to the deck and watch the land disappear behind a trail of froth.


Some years we took longer ferry crossings, where we'd try and sleep on the benches. We'd have activity books, packs of cards and happy families. One year we took a particularly rough crossing on a hover craft, the only one that decided to sail that day. I think my sister and my dad were the only ones on the whole boat who didn't throw up and the waves came up higher than the windows. It's fair to say that we never took the hover craft again.

Once in France we'd drive until we reached our campsite for the next a couple of weeks. We'd stop at the side of the road stopping places and hope that the toilets wouldn't be the hole in the ground kind where you'd have to squat. The parking always had picnic benches and smelt of pine trees, we'd stretch our legs before cramping back in the car to continue our journey. We'd pass by fields of sunflowers, poppies and corn, the occasional Chateaux on the horizon. Towns would look different and the highlight was always going to the big french Hypermarkets. We'd spend hours there, looking at all the fresh produce, bagging up cherries and being able to press the symbol on the weighing machines. We'd always be allowed to choose a bar of chocolate, the own brand, wrapped just in clear cellophane. I'd always choose either hazelnut or one with rice crispies in. We'd stock up on biscuits and if we were lucky got a Pez dispenser. We used to look at all the bikes and toys lined up and I remember using our 1 franc coins the get bubblegum and plastic rings from the little machines.

I remember the excitement of driving into the holiday park, finding the eurocamp reception and waiting in the car until my dad reappeared with the courier who would cycle ahead of use to show us our home. We'd usually stay in the tents, which had separate bedroom compartments and red framed metal beds. We'd roll out our sleeping bags and place our favourite toy we'd brought from home on the bed. There'd be a little kitchen and a big door to the outside sitting area complete with white plastic table and chairs and the classic Eurocamp red and green umbrella. Sometimes we'd take our bikes and set about exploring the row and begin to make friends with the other children near by.


We'd go to the kids clubs where we'd have our faces painted, we'd play board games and sports. Other days we'd spend all day by the pool, and always hoped for a park that had water slides. The campsites would be in big pine forest and be hot and sunny. I remember visiting French towns, walking around gardens and old houses. Sometimes we'd visit a beach and meet up with family friends who happened to be staying in the same area as us. The days were always long and my sisters were always my playmates. My parents would make friends with other English families and we'd share meals. I remember always eating artichoke, pistachio nuts and trying olives for the first time. We'd stay up late and listen to the crickets and hunt for fireflies. The holiday seemed to last for ages, and honestly I loved them. We did do other holidays, and were lucky enough to visit the USA a few times as well as Greece and Italy, but I will always associate my childhood holidays with France and Eurocamp.

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Last year when we went to visit my sister in Barcelona we decided last minute to book a Eurocamp break a short distance from Barcelona. It was the first time we'd been back since I was a child and honestly I didn't know what to expect. But we had a great time, and Theo loved it and asked to go back again the following year.

We hadn't really thought about where we would go this year, and since we found out that Rohan is due to have potentially a few surgeries at some point this year, it made it really hard to plan and commit to putting money down. So when Eurocamp contacted me at the beginning of the year about visiting one of their parks, as part of a review, there was no hesitation at all. We wanted to try out another park anyway, so this was a perfect opportunity.


We've been thinking of trying to take Theo to visit Disneyland Paris for a year or so but trying to work out a way to do it. We can't afford to stay at one of the hotels or just go for a few days (we hardly go abroad so really need to make the most of being in a different country!) so when this came up we decided to combine the two and pick a park close to Disney. This also meant that we were just over an hour outside of Paris, and Theo has been obsessed with visiting the Eiffel Tower for a long time after seeing it in various books. We also wanted to find a park that emulated those childhood memories and had to have a good pool seeing as that's what Theo loves doing (and now Rohan too!)

As a note we could've chosen a park anywhere, and in the future now that we've got Disney out of our system, I'd love to be able to visit a different part of France or another country. Eurocamp have places in parks all over Europe and I'd love to visit Italy, more of Spain, Portugal, Croatia, Holland, Germany and all over.

We stayed at a park called La Croix du Vieux Pont, near the town of Soissons just an hour or so north -east of Paris. The park was also a really good distance from Calais which meant that after a short ferry crossing it was only about a 2 hour drive to the campsite (it took us more than double that to get from Bristol to Dover!) which was ideal for us, as Rohan is still young and being stuck in a car for long journeys isn't that enjoyable.

When we arrived we drove around a little trying to find the Eurocamp reception. Going back as an adult and being in charge of knowing where to go is such a different experience! We eventually found the right place and picked up the keys to the mobile home we'd be staying in. I was a little disappointed we didn't get shown to our place by a courier, one because of childhood memories, but two (and most importantly) we weren't quite sure if we'd got the right place straightaway and there was no eurocamp branding on the home so it took a little while to confirm that it was the right place, which would have been nice not to have the stress of trying to find it. Last year at the other park we stayed on we were taken to our mobile home and all was fine.

But once we'd found it we set upon exploring and unpacking. The mobile home was pretty new and modern and the facilities were great. We were staying in an Azure holiday home which claims can sleep up to 6 adults, but in all honesty I think 6 would be a squeeze. The living area was slightly smaller than I was imagining, and the space in the bedrooms pretty limited. Theo and Rohan shared a room, with a single bed and a travel cot set up. The other room had two single beds, but very limited space in between them, so would make sharing with two adults fairly cramped! The main bedroom had a great king sized bed, but again not a lot of room around the edges. But all the rooms come with a great amount of storage, so you just had to make sure that all your things were put away to avoid feeling over cramped. But if you were a family of four, five or even six (two adults and the rest children) I think the space would be fine. 

The rest of the living space was pretty well thought out. There was a separate toilet and massive shower room, which actually was really good as our previous holiday home had a pretty small shower room. It meant that it was actually a better place to get ready than the bedrooms. The kitchen was pretty well equipped, and the appliances all modern. Something that differed from our last place we stayed in, was that there was a proper fixed table (the other had a moveable pull out table around the sofa) with six chairs, which was great for being able to share meals inside with. It did eat into quite a lot of the living space though, so I'm not sure whether it was for the best or not, but it was good for food preparation.  One other thing to mention was that the main bedroom door opened right onto the kitchen and the chairs would often get in the way of the door being able to close so made it a little annoying! The rest of the living space was taken up with an L shaped sofa which was comfy, but perhaps didn't have the best covering to make it feel cosy. I might also add that it didn't have air conditioning, just a fan, and even in June it was quite warm, but I think that at some campsites they do come with a/c so it's worth checking if that's a big deal for you (I know in Spain last year in August it was definitely needed!)

 It was all quite easy to keep clean which is good. We also requested baby items and it came with the classic ikea highchair (always a winner!) and a booster seat. Luckily we bought our own washing basket which doubled up as a baby bath which we used for Rohan an just sat him on the deck with! Because the holiday home was modern a lot of the features and building materials were also environmentally friendly, which I thought was a positive step. Another great feature was that all the windows had pull up black out blinds and mosquito nets, which made it easier to keep the light out of the boys room when they eventually went to bed, and we didn't get bitten once!


The best part of the holiday home was the great covered decking area out the front of the home. It was fenced and had a gate which meant it was perfect for Rohan to be able to be out there too without us worrying about him going down the steps. It also had a large table with lots of chairs and we spent most of our time out here, eating meals, playing games and storing our swimming things and shoes. It There were a few thunder storms whilst we were there, and it was great to be able to still sit outside and watch it whilst the rain poured down but be kept dry. The campsite was also brilliantly laid out meaning that each pitch had their own front garden, with sun loungers and a bbq, which had a lot of space and offered great privacy. I loved how much green there was, and each of the pitches in our area had their own willow tree. We also had a some very friendly ducks and little birds who liked to come and visit us daily and I just loved how peaceful it was. 

We did really like our accommodation despite of the points I've mentioned. I think having less space is to be expected from mobile homes, and all the beds were really comfy and like I mentioned the storage was great. The homes come with all the basics you need for cooking and eating, and the beds with pillows and duvets. You have the option of adding on bedding and towels for an extra cost, which we did as it was just one less thing to think about and take up room, but you could easily just bring your own too if you were on a budget. You can also purchase an essentials pack which includes things like washing up liquid, oil and sponges, again great to not have to think about these things, but also easy to pick up at the supermarket. 

We were given a welcome pack explaining bits about the park, such as opening hours of the shops, restaurant and pool. From memory and our last experience we did have a courier come round to our holiday home to check that we'd settled in ok and ask if we had any questions or needed anything, which we were disappointed to find that they didn't do here. We did have to go back to reception a few times to find out information, and whilst they were helpful it would have been nice to feel a little looked after and not forgotten! We had to go and ask about the kids club and certain questions about the park which could have been answered if they'd come for a check up. Anyway, on the whole they were friendly and perhaps some people prefer to be left alone to just get on with their holiday! (It may be different on other parks, as it was last year for us)

The park itself was really good. It was well laid out and easy to walk around and discover all it had to offer. It had all the facilities you could need, such as a well stocked shop and bakery with fresh bread daily. It had a gift shop which sold toys, clothes, postcards and stamps, a few laundrettes with self service machines and toilet blocks dotted about. There were also play parks, the pool complex and then a few different lakes. One of the lakes was for fishing and you could also hire out pedalos (which we did but will share later!) a smaller lake which was for swimming and surrounded by sand with a beachside bar and restaurant to get snacks, meals, ice-cream and drinks. There were quite a few really good play parks dotted around too. There was the main bar area and restaurant also, located by the pools, but again I'll write a little more about the pool later! 

What we loved about the park was how green it was, each path and road was carefully thought out, and there were lots of trees, bushes, hedges and loads of beautiful beds full of flowers. There were climbing roses all over the place and it was all so well kept and looked after. The whole place was really clean too and it was a lovely place to walk around. There is also part of the local river than runs by the bottom of the park and an entrance to what looked like a formal park just by our home. We ran out of time to explore properly, as really I feel we needed longer than a week, what with having two days off the park going out and about. Really if you take out the two days for travelling we only had five full days, when really at least 10 days would have been the perfect amount. 


Once we'd settled in and unpacked it was pretty late so we had our first dinner sitting on the decking and played some games. We were pretty excited to explore the next day, and recover a little from the journey. We visited the local supermarket about 20 minutes away and stocked up on all we needed for the week. We planned to eat mostly at the holiday home to save money (as we needed to save for our outings!) as well as picking out some childhood favourites, and maybe going a little overboard with chocolate and biscuits...

I'll leave it there for now and share a little more about the pools and beach, and what we got up to whilst on the park, as well as share our trips out! 

I made a little video of our first few days too! Keep an eye out for more soon! 


We were gifted our accomadation, travel and extras in return for a review, but all my thoughts, opinions, images and words are my own.

So that was Summer; Part One


So that was that, Summer has passed in a hazy blur once more. I think we spent more time by the coast than we did in the city and for me that's always a good thing.

Not long after school broke up we packed up the car (with A LOT of stuff) and headed South for a week of camping in Cornwall. We drove to the Lizard Point, an area we'd both not really explored since we were children and made it our home for the week. We went camping last year in our bell tent but had to cut it short due to my horrible morning sickness in early pregnancy with Rohan. So we were determined to make it work this year, with a five year old and a baby. We definitely upped our camping game though and even had a pitch with electricity which helped!

The first few days we were gifted great weather, so of course were drawn to the beach. I think we may have started with the best as we visited Kynance Cove just down the road and joined the crowds as we walked over the beautiful heather topped cliffs down towards the sparkling blue sea. We managed to find a spot and pitch our beach shelter just in time for Rohan to have his first three hour long nap on the beach. Sometimes there's nothing more comforting than the memory of falling asleep on the beach, still being able to hear the noise of the waves crashing, the shrieks of playing children and conversation all around you.

We paddled in the crystal clear waters, jumping over waves taking in the beauty of the scenery. After a long afternoon with the picnic complete we climbed to the top of the cliff to have our first cornish cream tea and ice cream whilst looking over the bay.

The next day was followed by much of the same, we headed to a different beach armed this time with a wet suit and a body board and tried our hand at surfing the waves a little. Theo was apprehensive at first, and after a little (massive) meltdown, I manage to persuade him how fun it was and he gave it a go eventually, and did really like it! Rohan had another mega beach nap and we stayed until the the sun started to hide behind the forming clouds and evening was drawing in. That evening we went to get fish and chips and eat them by a harbour side. The perfect holiday day.

We might just skip over the next day, as it rained ALL day. It was hard to believe that the day before we'd been laying on the beach and applying suncream. We spent the morning on the campsite at the indoor pool and play area before attempting to visit a very wet Falmouth and go to a museum. To cut a long story short, the museum had a massive queue as the rest of Cornwall apparently had the same idea, and it was pretty expensive to go in, so we admitted defeat and found a cafe for some cream tea and hot chocolate before trudging back home again for a cozy night in the tent!

The rest I'll save for another time!



So that was Summer; Part One


So that was that, Summer has passed in a hazy blur once more. I think we spent more time by the coast than we did in the city and for me that's always a good thing.

Not long after school broke up we packed up the car (with A LOT of stuff) and headed South for a week of camping in Cornwall. We drove to the Lizard Point, an area we'd both not really explored since we were children and made it our home for the week. We went camping last year in our bell tent but had to cut it short due to my horrible morning sickness in early pregnancy with Rohan. So we were determined to make it work this year, with a five year old and a baby. We definitely upped our camping game though and even had a pitch with electricity which helped!

The first few days we were gifted great weather, so of course were drawn to the beach. I think we may have started with the best as we visited Kynance Cove just down the road and joined the crowds as we walked over the beautiful heather topped cliffs down towards the sparkling blue sea. We managed to find a spot and pitch our beach shelter just in time for Rohan to have his first three hour long nap on the beach. Sometimes there's nothing more comforting than the memory of falling asleep on the beach, still being able to hear the noise of the waves crashing, the shrieks of playing children and conversation all around you.

We paddled in the crystal clear waters, jumping over waves taking in the beauty of the scenery. After a long afternoon with the picnic complete we climbed to the top of the cliff to have our first cornish cream tea and ice cream whilst looking over the bay.

The next day was followed by much of the same, we headed to a different beach armed this time with a wet suit and a body board and tried our hand at surfing the waves a little. Theo was apprehensive at first, and after a little (massive) meltdown, I manage to persuade him how fun it was and he gave it a go eventually, and did really like it! Rohan had another mega beach nap and we stayed until the the sun started to hide behind the forming clouds and evening was drawing in. That evening we went to get fish and chips and eat them by a harbour side. The perfect holiday day.

We might just skip over the next day, as it rained ALL day. It was hard to believe that the day before we'd been laying on the beach and applying suncream. We spent the morning on the campsite at the indoor pool and play area before attempting to visit a very wet Falmouth and go to a museum. To cut a long story short, the museum had a massive queue as the rest of Cornwall apparently had the same idea, and it was pretty expensive to go in, so we admitted defeat and found a cafe for some cream tea and hot chocolate before trudging back home again for a cozy night in the tent!

The rest I'll save for another time!



Strawberry picking near Bristol!


Last weekend we decided that we'd better go Strawberry picking before it got too late in the season, like last year. It was the harbourside festival on in Bristol, and neither Rob or I had any intention of dragging two children down there (I'm sure it's ace but crowds and business isn't our thing!) so getting out of the city was appealing. We drove to a place that we've been going to for the past three years, (you can see our first trip here...look how little Theo looks!) so it's nice to have some sort of tradition. It's called Chosen Hill farm near Chew Valley lake. The drive over itself is beautiful as you round the valley the get stunning views back down towards the lake and hills in the distance.

It feels sort of special to be slowly introducing our family traditions to Rohan, bringing him along and showing him all these new places. Obviously he's only a baby so isn't really aware of where we are or what we're doing, but it's nice to think he's joining in! These are the things we looked forward to most of all when thinking about having another baby, and especially once Rohan was actually here but in hospital. It felt like such an unknown future, not knowing when we'd be able to get back to our normal lives and start doing all these traditional things as a family. So it's days like these that we soak up even more and revel in the ability to actually be able to achieve those outings and experiences. It may not seem like much, but to us it means so much!

Anyway, this year we went a little wild with the amount of strawberries we collected, and like an over excited kid in a sweet shop we took them up to pay and were a little surprised at how much we'd spent! So armed with our 3kgs of strawberries we heaved them home and decided to try our hand at making jam for the first time. Theo, after helping to make it, then decided that he wanted to give some jars as a goodbye gift to his teachers which I thought was a very sweet idea!

So here's to another year of strawberry picking!




Strawberry picking near Bristol!


Last weekend we decided that we'd better go Strawberry picking before it got too late in the season, like last year. It was the harbourside festival on in Bristol, and neither Rob or I had any intention of dragging two children down there (I'm sure it's ace but crowds and business isn't our thing!) so getting out of the city was appealing. We drove to a place that we've been going to for the past three years, (you can see our first trip here...look how little Theo looks!) so it's nice to have some sort of tradition. It's called Chosen Hill farm near Chew Valley lake. The drive over itself is beautiful as you round the valley the get stunning views back down towards the lake and hills in the distance.

It feels sort of special to be slowly introducing our family traditions to Rohan, bringing him along and showing him all these new places. Obviously he's only a baby so isn't really aware of where we are or what we're doing, but it's nice to think he's joining in! These are the things we looked forward to most of all when thinking about having another baby, and especially once Rohan was actually here but in hospital. It felt like such an unknown future, not knowing when we'd be able to get back to our normal lives and start doing all these traditional things as a family. So it's days like these that we soak up even more and revel in the ability to actually be able to achieve those outings and experiences. It may not seem like much, but to us it means so much!

Anyway, this year we went a little wild with the amount of strawberries we collected, and like an over excited kid in a sweet shop we took them up to pay and were a little surprised at how much we'd spent! So armed with our 3kgs of strawberries we heaved them home and decided to try our hand at making jam for the first time. Theo, after helping to make it, then decided that he wanted to give some jars as a goodbye gift to his teachers which I thought was a very sweet idea!

So here's to another year of strawberry picking!




A family walk : The bluebell woods




Since the bluebells have all but faded now I thought I would share a few photographs from a walk we took a few weeks back (and it's definitely not because I've only just got round to editing them...)

We drove out of Bristol to explore a new to us area, and managed to find not one but two woodlands to walk around. This was the second which we stumbled upon on our way back and couldn't resist pulling the car over and getting out. The woodland was full of tall Beech trees with wide gaps between the trunks in which the ground was carpeted in a haze of purple. The late afternoon sun slanted through the trees throwing glistening light on some and creating deep hues of blue in the shadows. Theo and I explored the woodland which had a slightly eerie quiet about it as people just walked contently around in awe of the beautiful flowers. Satisfied that we had witnessed one of the best parts that Spring has to offer we climbed back in the car and headed back into the city. Now we know that this place exists, I'm sure we'll be returning year after year. 

A family walk : The bluebell woods




Since the bluebells have all but faded now I thought I would share a few photographs from a walk we took a few weeks back (and it's definitely not because I've only just got round to editing them...)

We drove out of Bristol to explore a new to us area, and managed to find not one but two woodlands to walk around. This was the second which we stumbled upon on our way back and couldn't resist pulling the car over and getting out. The woodland was full of tall Beech trees with wide gaps between the trunks in which the ground was carpeted in a haze of purple. The late afternoon sun slanted through the trees throwing glistening light on some and creating deep hues of blue in the shadows. Theo and I explored the woodland which had a slightly eerie quiet about it as people just walked contently around in awe of the beautiful flowers. Satisfied that we had witnessed one of the best parts that Spring has to offer we climbed back in the car and headed back into the city. Now we know that this place exists, I'm sure we'll be returning year after year. 

Postcards from London, part two

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The second instalment of our little London weekend! After our pretty chilly but wonderful walk around a tiny portion of Kew Gardens we drove over to North Kensington. Can I just interject here and say how terrified I was of driving in London! I've only ever driven around it really, never through it but I'm happy to report that actually it wasn't that bad, if driving in Bristol has taught me anything its just to be a little more forceful and confident.

Anyway, anyway, we drove over to Kensington to check into our accommodation, a lovely little airbnb flat. It was our first time using an airbnb and I have to say I'm a total convert! The flat we stayed in wasn't really someones lived in home, but was still full of lovely touches and a homely feel. I mentioned before that my sister was flying to the UK for the week and was staying with us in London, which meant we had to find somewhere for us all to stay without being crammed into a tiny uncomfortable hotel miles away. The flat was really stylish, and clean with a giant comfy sofa bed and big double bedroom with views over London. We were greeted by the host and welcomed, and she even bought us a big loaf of beautiful bread! After we dropped our bags we decided to head back over to Chiswick to visit the very lovely Alexis in her beautiful home! Fans of her wonderful blog will be used to seeing glimpses into her stylish yet super cosy home and (in a fan girl way!) I feel lucky to have been invited there in person! We hung out in the kitchen under the amazing large windows chatting over tea and snacks as the boys tried to make as much noise and carnage as possible. They did a spot of biscuit decorating before it was time to head back to the flat to meet my sister from the tube.


After a little rest at the flat we walked over to Portobello Road for dinner, heading to the lovely Pizza East where we met with a friend in the busy and bustling restaurant. After our meal we made our way back with a super sleepy Theo and spent the evening catching up and chatting with our friends.


We woke pretty bright and early finishing off the bread and dragging ourselves out for a walk to the nearby park. We lusted over pretty much every house around, and imagined what it would be like to afford to live in London! The sun was warm and the trees were in blossom as we played in the small park and found yet more logs to climb around on.


Soon it was time to pack up and leave the flat and journey into the centre. The rest of the day passed in such a blur, as we met up with my other sister at the V&A for lunch and handed over Theo for an afternoon at the science museum, so my sister and I could head over to north London for our Quill London modern calligraphy course and Rob went over to Wembley to watch Bristol city play. Lovely. Several hours later we raced over the city once more to collect the boy and meet back with Rob before waving my sister off at the tube and heading on a loooong journey back home. Phew. What a weekend!


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So I mentioned last week that I've started to dabble in a bit of video making, and here's a little something from our trip. Me and my sister are hopefully going to start a channel where we make little videos of our weeks and trips, hauls, finds etc so check it out!

Postcards from London, part two

 photo IMG_3475_zpsqhb9ac9l.jpg

The second instalment of our little London weekend! After our pretty chilly but wonderful walk around a tiny portion of Kew Gardens we drove over to North Kensington. Can I just interject here and say how terrified I was of driving in London! I've only ever driven around it really, never through it but I'm happy to report that actually it wasn't that bad, if driving in Bristol has taught me anything its just to be a little more forceful and confident.

Anyway, anyway, we drove over to Kensington to check into our accommodation, a lovely little airbnb flat. It was our first time using an airbnb and I have to say I'm a total convert! The flat we stayed in wasn't really someones lived in home, but was still full of lovely touches and a homely feel. I mentioned before that my sister was flying to the UK for the week and was staying with us in London, which meant we had to find somewhere for us all to stay without being crammed into a tiny uncomfortable hotel miles away. The flat was really stylish, and clean with a giant comfy sofa bed and big double bedroom with views over London. We were greeted by the host and welcomed, and she even bought us a big loaf of beautiful bread! After we dropped our bags we decided to head back over to Chiswick to visit the very lovely Alexis in her beautiful home! Fans of her wonderful blog will be used to seeing glimpses into her stylish yet super cosy home and (in a fan girl way!) I feel lucky to have been invited there in person! We hung out in the kitchen under the amazing large windows chatting over tea and snacks as the boys tried to make as much noise and carnage as possible. They did a spot of biscuit decorating before it was time to head back to the flat to meet my sister from the tube.


After a little rest at the flat we walked over to Portobello Road for dinner, heading to the lovely Pizza East where we met with a friend in the busy and bustling restaurant. After our meal we made our way back with a super sleepy Theo and spent the evening catching up and chatting with our friends.


We woke pretty bright and early finishing off the bread and dragging ourselves out for a walk to the nearby park. We lusted over pretty much every house around, and imagined what it would be like to afford to live in London! The sun was warm and the trees were in blossom as we played in the small park and found yet more logs to climb around on.


Soon it was time to pack up and leave the flat and journey into the centre. The rest of the day passed in such a blur, as we met up with my other sister at the V&A for lunch and handed over Theo for an afternoon at the science museum, so my sister and I could head over to north London for our Quill London modern calligraphy course and Rob went over to Wembley to watch Bristol city play. Lovely. Several hours later we raced over the city once more to collect the boy and meet back with Rob before waving my sister off at the tube and heading on a loooong journey back home. Phew. What a weekend!


 photo IMG_3472_zpsps21fnam.jpg
 photo IMG_3469_zpsdn6lattd.jpg
 photo IMG_3480_zpsctashese.jpg
 photo IMG_3486_zpso8gwyhoz.jpg
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 photo IMG_3449_zpsg8ejepkh.jpg
 photo IMG_3468_zpsdhqdddpm.jpg
 photo IMG_3476_zpsos6flyiz.jpg
 photo IMG_3482_zpssdhuccac.jpg  photo IMG_3496_zpsiql1kn1t.jpg
 photo IMG_3485_zpszj9d3mxu.jpg  photo IMG_3515_zpsl2o61mib.jpg  photo IMG_3514_zpsrjcphj9z.jpg  photo IMG_3517_zps4buhooi5.jpg  photo IMG_3510_zpsngfhwg0j.jpg  photo IMG_3540_zpssdkbsqwu.jpg  photo IMG_3527_zpsrch1xk4s.jpg  photo IMG_3524_zpssye0snzz.jpg  photo IMG_3519_zpsrpiq2kir.jpg  photo IMG_3530_zpsjkeqwkzf.jpg  photo IMG_3536_zpsyofzfury.jpg  photo IMG_3535_zps77npvjgl.jpg  photo IMG_3531_zpsbmhdmwuo.jpg

So I mentioned last week that I've started to dabble in a bit of video making, and here's a little something from our trip. Me and my sister are hopefully going to start a channel where we make little videos of our weeks and trips, hauls, finds etc so check it out!

Devon part two


A few more photos from our trip to Devon a few weekends ago. We set out on a mission on the Sunday to visit Father Christmas as it was likely to be our only chance to do so. We decided to visit a strange favourite as ours, Trago Mills. There's not one word really to describe what Trago is; a garden centre, an adventure park, a department store, as its all of those rolled into one, with a miniture railway, a model railway, arcades, rides and an animal farm thrown in too. One thing I do know is that it would be the first place we'd visit if there was a zombie apocalypse, they literally have everything in there that you would need to survive! 

Anyway I'm getting sidetracked. The weather was cold, but even so we waited in a queue for an hour or so , like the good British people we are and tried not to grumble when we could no longer feel our toes, to ride the miniature train to see Father Christmas. I think the excitement kept Theo going, and as we finally boarded the train the smile that spread across his face was well worth the wait. It was a sweet experience for us all! 

We spent the rest of the time looking in the shop, visiting the model railway, meeting some owls and having a play on some rides before the sun disappeared and the cold became too much the bear! 

Devon part two


A few more photos from our trip to Devon a few weekends ago. We set out on a mission on the Sunday to visit Father Christmas as it was likely to be our only chance to do so. We decided to visit a strange favourite as ours, Trago Mills. There's not one word really to describe what Trago is; a garden centre, an adventure park, a department store, as its all of those rolled into one, with a miniture railway, a model railway, arcades, rides and an animal farm thrown in too. One thing I do know is that it would be the first place we'd visit if there was a zombie apocalypse, they literally have everything in there that you would need to survive! 

Anyway I'm getting sidetracked. The weather was cold, but even so we waited in a queue for an hour or so , like the good British people we are and tried not to grumble when we could no longer feel our toes, to ride the miniature train to see Father Christmas. I think the excitement kept Theo going, and as we finally boarded the train the smile that spread across his face was well worth the wait. It was a sweet experience for us all! 

We spent the rest of the time looking in the shop, visiting the model railway, meeting some owls and having a play on some rides before the sun disappeared and the cold became too much the bear!